Early Career Seminars Seminarshttps://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/Early Career Seminars Seminarsen-usSat, 06 Jun 2020 06:06:48 +0000GSFC Summer Research Associate 2019 Presentationshttps://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/gsfc-summer-internship/2019/8/9/gsfc-summer-research-associate-2019-presentations/<b>Undergraduate Research Associates in Astrobiology: End-of Term Research Presentations</b> The GCA sponsors a summer program (URAA) in which talented undergraduate students conduct cutting-edge research under the direction of GCA scientist-mentors. The students present summaries of their research objectives and findings during an end-of-term session delivered both locally and streamed to the astrobiology community as a whole. The Class of 2019 will present on <b>Friday, August 9th at 1-2 PM EDT in Building 34, Room W130</b>. The Agenda is given below. You are invited to attend, either locally or remotely. <b>Presentations:</b> <table> <tr style="vertical-align: top;"> <td style="vertical-align: top; padding-right: 5px;"> <img src="https://nai.nasa.gov/media/medialibrary/2019/08/Cobb.png" width="80px"> </td> <td style="font-size: 14px;"> <i>Acid Weathering: Analogue Analysis using Terrestrial Acid Lakes and Basalt Clay Synthesis</i><br/><br /> <b>Elizabeth Cobb</b> <i>(University of Arkansas)</i><br/> Mentor: Dr. Heather Graham<br/> </td> </tr> </table> <br /><br /> <table> <tr style="vertical-align: top;"> <td style="vertical-align: top; padding-right: 5px;"> <img src="https://nai.nasa.gov/media/medialibrary/2019/08/Drozd.png" width="80px"> </td> <td style="font-size: 14px;"> <i>Polymerization of Amino Acids under plausible Early Earth Conditions</i><br/><br /> <b>Juliana Drozd</b> <i>(Massachusetts Institute of Technology)</i><br/> Mentor: Dr. Eric Parker<br/> </td> </tr> </table> <br /><br /> <table> <tr style="vertical-align: top;"> <td style="vertical-align: top; padding-right: 5px;"> <img src="https://nai.nasa.gov/media/medialibrary/2019/08/Craddock.png" width="80px"> </td> <td style="font-size: 14px;"> <i>Detection of Organic Molecules in Mars-Relevant Material</i><br/><br /> <b>Maxwell Craddock</b> <i>(Virginia Tech)</i><br/> Mentor: Dr. James Lewis<br/> </td> </tr> </table> <br /><br /> <table> <tr style="vertical-align: top;"> <td style="vertical-align: top; padding-right: 5px;"> <img src="https://nai.nasa.gov/media/medialibrary/2019/08/Ramierez.png" width="80px"> </td> <td style="font-size: 14px;"> <i>Method for the Analysis of Meteoritic Amides</i><br/><br /> <b>Jose Ramirez-Colon</b> <i>(University of Puerto-Rico)</i><br/> Mentor: Dr. Jose Aponte<br/> </td> </tr> </table> <br /><br /> <table> <tr style="vertical-align: top;"> <td style="vertical-align: top; padding-right: 5px;"> <img src="https://nai.nasa.gov/media/medialibrary/2019/08/Munoz.png" width="80px"> </td> <td style="font-size: 14px;"> <i>Fast Atmospheric Retrievals with PSG</i><br/><br /> <b>Carlos Munoz Romero</b> <i> (Grinnell College)</i><br/> Mentor: Dr. Geronimo Villanueva<br/> </td> </tr> </table> <br /><br /> <table> <tr style="vertical-align: top;"> <td style="vertical-align: top; padding-right: 5px;"> <img src="https://nai.nasa.gov/media/medialibrary/2019/08/Frates.png" width="80px"> </td> <td style="font-size: 14px;"> <i>Fluorescent Detection of Microbes: Higher Sensitivity Advances in Planetary Protection</i><br/><br /> <b>Erin Frates</b> <i> (University of Rhode Island)</i><br/> Mentor: Melissa Floyd<br/> </td> </tr> </table> <br /><br /> <b>To join using a web browser:</b> The slides and audio/video for this meeting will be presented using Adobe Connect. To join the meeting, connect to: <a href="https://ac.arc.nasa.gov/gsfc/" target="_blank">https://ac.arc.nasa.gov/gsfc/</a> If you are having problems connecting, you can try joining <a href="https://ac.arc.nasa.gov/gsfc/?launcher=false" target="_blank">https://ac.arc.nasa.gov/gsfc/?launcher=false</a>, rebooting your computer, or try joining from another network. To view the slides, connect to <a href="https://ac.arc.nasa.gov/gsfc/" target="_blank">https://ac.arc.nasa.gov/gsfc/</a>https://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/gsfc-summer-internship/2019/8/9/gsfc-summer-research-associate-2019-presentations/Ask an Astrobiologisthttps://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/saganetorg-ask-an-astrobiologist-series/2018/9/25/ask-an-astrobiologist/"Ask an Astrobiologist" is a live interview with a renowned astrobiologist! This format is interactive and allows participants to ask questions on Twitter, Facebook, & SAGANet! All episodes can be found in YouTube and audio podcast versions on the <a href="https://astrobiology.nasa.gov/ask-an-astrobiologist/">official Ask An Astrobiologist website.</a>. Follow us on Twitter at @NASAAstrobio with hashtag #AskAstrobio! <iframe width="492" height="277" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PL2vV9BqKn2zcpYK_s7n72lOk3Ehzxut1g" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>https://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/saganetorg-ask-an-astrobiologist-series/2018/9/25/ask-an-astrobiologist/GSFC Summer Research Associate 2018 Presentationshttps://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/gsfc-summer-internship/2018/8/2/gsfc-summer-research-associate-2018-presentations/<b>Goddard Center for Astrobiology (GCA) - NASA Astrobiology Institute</b> <b>Undergraduate Research Associates in Astrobiology: End-of Term Research Presentations</b> The GCA sponsors a summer program (URAA) in which talented undergraduate students conduct cutting-edge research under the direction of GCA scientist-mentors. The students present summaries of their research objectives and findings during an end-of-term session delivered both locally and over the internet to the NAI as a whole. The Class of 2018 will present on <b>Thursday, August 2nd at 1-2 PM EDT in Building 34, Room W130</b>. The Agenda is given below. You are invited to attend, either locally or remotely. <b>Presentations:</b> <table> <tr style="vertical-align: top;"> <td style="vertical-align: top; padding-right: 5px;"> <img src="https://nai.nasa.gov/media/medialibrary/2018/07/Gabi_Englemann-Suissa.jpg" width="80px"> </td> <td style="font-size: 14px;"> <i>Ocean Worlds Around M Stars: What to ExPECTRA</i><br /><br /> <b>Gabrielle Suissa*</b> <i>(Columbia University)</i><br/> Mentor: Dr. Avi Mandell </td> </tr> </table> <br/> <table> <tr style="vertical-align: top;"> <td style="vertical-align: top; padding-right: 5px;"> <img src="https://nai.nasa.gov/media/medialibrary/2018/07/Maggie_Weng.jpg" width="80px"> </td> <td style="font-size: 14px;"> <i>Looking for Life in Salty Environments with Nanopore Sequencing</i><br/><br /> <b>Margaret Weng</b> <i>(Washington University - St. Louis)</i><br/> Mentor: Dr. William Brinckerhoff<br/> </td> </tr> </table> <br/> <table> <tr style="vertical-align: top;"> <td style="vertical-align: top; padding-right: 5px;"> <img src="https://nai.nasa.gov/media/medialibrary/2018/07/Giannini_Guzman.jpg" width="80px"> </td> <td style="font-size: 14px;"> <i>Designing a Python Module for the Calculation of Molecular Parameters and Production Rates in Comets</i><br/><br /> <b>Giannina Guzman</b> <i>(Villanova University)</i><br/> Mentor: Dr. Miguel de Val-Borro<br/> </td> </tr> </table> <br/> <table> <tr style="vertical-align: top;"> <td style="vertical-align: top; padding-right: 5px;"> <img src="https://nai.nasa.gov/media/medialibrary/2018/07/Ella_Mullikin.jpg" width="80px"> </td> <td style="font-size: 14px;"> <i>Aliphatic Ring Compounds in the Interstellar Medium</i><br/><br /> <b>Ella Mullikin*</b> <i>(Wellesley College)</i><br/> Mentor: Dr. Reggie Hudson<br/> </td> </tr> </table> <br /><br /> *MATHER NOBEL SCHOLAR 2018 <br /><br /> <b>How to Participate in this Virtual Seminar</b> <b>To join using a web browser:</b> The slides and audio/video for this meeting will be presented using Adobe Connect. To join the meeting, connect to: <a href="https://connect.arc.nasa.gov/gsfc/" target="_blank">https://connect.arc.nasa.gov/gsfc/</a> If you are having problems connecting, you can try joining <a href="https://connect.arc.nasa.gov/gsfc/?launcher=false" target="_blank">https://connect.arc.nasa.gov/gsfc/?launcher=false</a>, rebooting your computer, or try joining from another network. <b>To join using a videoconferencing system:</b> Please RSVP to Greg Harbert (<a href="mailto:gregory.j.harbert@nasa.gov">gregory.j.harbert@nasa.gov</a>) ONLY if you will be joining by videoconference. To view the slides, connect to <a href="https://connect.arc.nasa.gov/gsfc/" target="_blank">https://connect.arc.nasa.gov/gsfc/</a>https://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/gsfc-summer-internship/2018/8/2/gsfc-summer-research-associate-2018-presentations/AbGradCon 2018https://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/abgradcon/2018/6/5/abgradcon-2018/AbGradCon (Astrobiology Graduate Conference) provides a unique setting for astrobiologically-inclined graduate students and early career researchers to come together to share their research, collaborate, and network. AbGradCon 2018 marks the 14th year of this conference--each time in a different place and organized by a different group of students, but always with the original charter as a guide. <iframe width="492" height="277" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PL2vV9BqKn2zdYjJH8FWPerMGKCDTViIZT" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe> These meetings have been wildly successful both when connected to AbSciCon, and as stand-alone conferences. Since it is organized and attended by only graduate students, post docs, and select undergraduates, AbGradCon is an ideal venue for the next generation of career astrobiologists to form bonds, share ideas, and discuss the issues that will shape the future of the field. Take a look at the AbGradCon 2017 conference website to see what's happened in the past.https://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/abgradcon/2018/6/5/abgradcon-2018/GSFC Summer Research Associate 2017 Presentationshttps://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/gsfc-summer-internship/2017/8/3/gsfc-summer-research-associate-2017-presentations/Each Undergraduate Research Associate in Astrobiology conducts intensive state-of-the-art research with an individual scientist-mentor. Please join us as the fruits of these efforts are presented by the Class of 2017 to NASA’s Astrobiology Institute in a distributed seminar presented over the Internet. <b>Presenters:</b> <table> <tr style="vertical-align: top;"> <td style="vertical-align: top; padding-right: 5px;"> <img src="https://nai.nasa.gov/media/medialibrary/2017/07/Camarca_Maria.jpg" width="80px"> </td> <td style="font-size: 14px;"> <i>A Postcard from the Young Solar System: Infrared Signatures of Comet 252P/LINEAR</i><br/><br/> <b>Maria Camarca</b> <i>(Marymount University)</i><br/> Mentor: Lucas Paganini </td> </tr> </table> <br/> <table> <tr style="vertical-align: top;"> <td style="vertical-align: top; padding-right: 5px;"> <img src="https://nai.nasa.gov/media/medialibrary/2017/07/Melles_Tucker.jpg" width="80px"> </td> <td style="font-size: 14px;"> <i>Optimization of Monocarboxylic Acid Detection for Meteoritic Analysis using HPLC-FLD</i><br/><br/> <b>Tucker Melles</b> <i>(Florida Institute of Technology)</i><br/> Mentor: Jose Aponte<br/> </td> </tr> </table> <br/> <table> <tr style="vertical-align: top;"> <td style="vertical-align: top; padding-right: 5px;"> <img src="https://nai.nasa.gov/media/medialibrary/2017/07/Yocum_Katarina.jpg" width="80px"> </td> <td style="font-size: 14px;"> <i>Rapid Degradation of Amino Acids on the Martian Surface due to Exposure to Cosmic Rays</i><br/><br/> <b>Katarina Yocum</b> <i>(Kutztown University)</i><br/> Mentor: Hannah McLain<br/> </td> </tr> </table> <br/> <table> <tr style="vertical-align: top;"> <td style="vertical-align: top; padding-right: 5px;"> <img src="https://nai.nasa.gov/media/medialibrary/2017/07/Frail_Sarah.jpg" width="80px"> </td> <td style="font-size: 14px;"> <i>Radiolysis of Uracil in Water Ice</i><br/><br/> <b>Sarah Frail</b> <i>(University of Maryland)</i><br/> Mentor: Perry Gerakines<br/> </td> </tr> </table>https://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/gsfc-summer-internship/2017/8/3/gsfc-summer-research-associate-2017-presentations/AbGradCon 2017https://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/abgradcon/2017/6/5/abgradcon-2017/AbGradCon (Astrobiology Graduate Conference) provides a unique setting for astrobiologically-inclined graduate students and early career researchers to come together to share their research, collaborate, and network. AbGradCon 2017 marks the 13th year of this conference--each time in a different place and organized by a different group of students, but always with the original charter as a guide. Since it is organized and attended by only graduate students, post docs, and select undergraduates (see below), AbGradCon is an ideal venue for the next generation of career astrobiologists to form bonds, share ideas, and discuss the issues that will shape the future of the field. All 27 talks/sessions can be watched on demand here: <iframe width="492" height="277" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PL2vV9BqKn2zd_SXnfjNohH8YXqqXXAO-s" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>https://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/abgradcon/2017/6/5/abgradcon-2017/GSFC Summer Research Associate 2016 Presentationshttps://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/gsfc-summer-internship/2016/8/4/gsfc-summer-research-associate-2016-presentations/Each Undergraduate Research Associate in Astrobiology conducts intensive state-of-the-art research with an individual scientist-mentor. Please join us as the fruits of these efforts are presented by the Class of 2016 to NASA’s Astrobiology Institute in a distributed seminar presented over the Internet. Presenters: Luke Tremblay (Clemson University) – “Exploring JWST’s Capability to Constrain Habitability on Simulated Terrestrial TESS Planets“ Mentor: Avi Mandell Pia Sen (U of Texas) – “Evaluating an Alternate Method for the Analysis of Amino Acids in Meteorites“ Mentor: Jose Aponte James Lai (McMaster University) – “Detection and Mapping of Astrobiologically Relevant Organic Molecules on Titan“ Mentor: Martin Cordiner Jonathon Nosowitz (Iona College) – “A High-Resolution Spectral Atlas of Mars: Searching for Unidentified Bands of CO2, Water and Organics“ Mentor: Geronimo Villanueva Erin Redwing (Penn State) – “Formation of Cemented, Salty Cap in Presence of Perchlorates in Martian Regolith“ Mentor: Alex Pavlov Mark Sutton (Wichita State) – “The MinION DNA Sequencer as a Life Detection Instrument“ Mentor: Will Brinckerhoffhttps://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/gsfc-summer-internship/2016/8/4/gsfc-summer-research-associate-2016-presentations/AbGradCon 2016https://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/abgradcon/2016/7/24/abgradcon-2016/AbGradCon (Astrobiology Graduate Conference) provides a unique setting for astrobiologically inclined graduate students and early career researchers to come together to share their research, collaborate, and network. AbGradCon 2016 marks the twelfth year of this conference—each time in a different place and organized by a different group of students, but always with the original charter as a guide. This year AbGradCon will be held in Boulder, CO at the University of Colorado, Boulder campus from July 24th – 27th. These meetings have been very successful both when connected to AbSciCon, and as stand-alone conferences. Since it is organized and attended by only graduate students and post docs, AbGradCon is an ideal venue for the next generation of career astrobiologists to form bonds, share ideas, and discuss the issues that will shape the future of the field. <iframe width="492" height="277" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PL2vV9BqKn2zfP5ou9WRWF2wvtCCYfEGME" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> For more information, please check the "AbGradCon 2016 website":http://abgradcon.org.https://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/abgradcon/2016/7/24/abgradcon-2016/Investigating Habitable Environments on Mars Using Orbital and Rover-Based Imaging Spectroscopyhttps://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/npp-alumni-seminars/2016/6/6/investigating-habitable-environments-on-mars-using-orbital-and-rover-based-imaging-spectroscopy/The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover is currently exploring an ancient habitable environment at the base of Mt. Sharp in Gale crater. The diverse stratigraphic sections along Curiosity’s future traverse record multiple environmental transitions that can provide insights into global-scale processes and the evolution of early aqueous environments on Mars. To better interpret these complex mineral stratigraphies, it is critical to correlate the mineralogic transitions with morphology, texture, slope, and other aspects of the physical stratigraphy; such correlations can be made between orbital and rover-based imaging spectroscopy measurements. Quantitative visible to near-infrared (VNIR) data from Curiosity’s Mastcam instrument allows for broad distinctions between different iron mineralogies, oxidation states, and hydrated phases. Mastcam multispectral images can be used to map spectral diversity across a given outcrop in combination with textural information such as grain size, sedimentary structures, diagenetic features, and contact geometries. At distances of up to several kilometers, Mastcam observations can be correlated with the larger-scale stratigraphy, and used to enhance mineralogical and stratigraphic mapping made from orbit, such as from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) instruments. Here I will present an overview of the instrumentation, technique, and major results from Mastcam’s imaging spectroscopy investigation at Mt. Sharp, and correlations with HiRISE and CRISM data to interpret the aqueous alteration history. I will also discuss plans for imaging science with the Mastcam-Z instrument on NASA’s next rover, which will launch in 2020. BIO: Dr. Melissa Rice is an Assistant Professor of Planetary Science at Western Washington University, where she has held a joint appointment in the Geology Department and the Physics & Astronomy Department since 2014. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Astronomy at Cornell University in 2012, and was a NASA Astrobiology Institute Postdoctoral fellow at Caltech from 2012-2014. Her research focuses on the sedimentology, stratigraphy and mineralogy of Mars. She is a collaborator on the active Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity missions, a Participating Scientist on the Mars Science Laboratory rover mission, and a Co-Investigator for the Mastcam-Z investigation in development for the Mars2020 rover mission.https://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/npp-alumni-seminars/2016/6/6/investigating-habitable-environments-on-mars-using-orbital-and-rover-based-imaging-spectroscopy/Chemical Gardens, Chimneys, and Fuel Cells: Simulating Prebiotic Chemistry in Hydrothermal Vents on Ocean Worldshttps://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/npp-alumni-seminars/2016/6/1/chemical-gardens-chimneys-and-fuel-cells-simulating-prebiotic-chemistry-in-hydrothermal-vents-on-ocean-worlds/Planetary water-rock interfaces generate energy in the form of redox, pH, and thermal gradients, particularly in hydrothermal systems where the reducing, heated vent fluid feeds back into the more oxidizing ocean. Alkaline vents produced by serpentinization have been proposed as a possible location for the emergence of life on the early Earth due to various factors, including the mineral precipitates that resemble inorganic catalysts in enzymes and the presence of electron donors and acceptors in hydrothermal systems (e.g. H2 + CH4 and CO2) that may have been utilized in the earliest metabolisms. Many of the factors prompting interest in alkaline hydrothermal vents on Earth may also have been present on early Mars, or even presently within icy worlds such as Europa or Enceladus. Of particular importance for possible proto-metabolic reactions in alkaline hydrothermal systems are mineral chimneys that precipitate at the vent fluid / seawater interface. Hydrothermal chimneys are an example of geological chemical gardens – a self-organizing non-equilibrium process that forms complex structures fueled by steep concentration gradients across the reaction-precipitation zone. Chemical garden and inorganic membrane systems have many properties of interest to the origin of life that can be simulated in the laboratory, for example: they can precipitate metastable catalytic mineral phases; the chemical garden structure can act as a flow-through chemical reactor and concentrator; and they can even generate electrical energy from the trans-membrane gradients and drive redox reactions. In this talk I will give an overview of how we use chemical gardens to simulate far-from-equilibrium geochemical systems such as vents, and future directions for using electrochemical / fuel cell techniques to characterize prebiotic potential and habitability in seafloor systems.https://nai.nasa.gov/seminars/early-career-seminars/npp-alumni-seminars/2016/6/1/chemical-gardens-chimneys-and-fuel-cells-simulating-prebiotic-chemistry-in-hydrothermal-vents-on-ocean-worlds/