1. NAI Newsletter

    February 04, 2015 Issue


    NEWS

    RECENTLY PUBLISHED RESEARCH

    CAREER & EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

    UPCOMING DEADLINES IN THE NEXT 30 DAYS


    NEWS


    NASA seeks new NASA Astrobiology Institute Director

    NASA seeks a new Director for the NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI). The ideal candidate will be an internationally recognized scientist with proven experience in leading or managing large interdisciplinary research programs or projects, possessed with a vision for leading the Institute into the future. Applicants for this position should have a broad scientific perspective on astrobiology, experience in conducting interdisciplinary scientific research, and demonstrated skills needed to harness the strengths of disparate research communities towards a greater goal. S/he should understand how to grow a research endeavor and respond to changing budget climates while focusing on maximizing the scientific return on NASA’s investments in astrobiology. S/he should have experience in leading a diverse staff ranging from established scientists to support personnel, resource planning, and executing budgets and schedules. S/he should be comfortable with modern information technologies and distributed research teams. NASA is particularly interested in applicants who will find ways to infuse astrobiology into NASA flight missions.

    The NAI Director is both the senior scientific officer and chief operating officer of the NAI. The Director coordinates scientific activities of the Institute’s member teams and is responsible and held accountable for all operational aspects of the NAI, including the administration of personnel, budget and NASA policies. The Director will lead the NAI in fulfilling its mission to perform, support, and catalyze collaborative interdisciplinary astrobiology research; train the next generation of astrobiologists; provide scientific and technical leadership for astrobiology space mission investigations; develop new information technology approaches for collaborations among widely distributed investigators; and support K-12 education and public outreach programs.

    Established in 1998 as part of NASA’s Astrobiology Program, the NAI is a virtual, distributed organization of competitively-selected teams that conduct and integrate astrobiology research and training programs in concert with the national and international science communities. The Institute has 12 teams including ~600 researchers distributed across ~100 organizations as well as 13 international partner organizations. Headquartered at NASA Ames Research Center in the heart of California’s Silicon Valley, the NAI links researchers across the US and around the globe using modern information technologies.

    The NAI serves a vital role in advancing the goals of the larger NASA Astrobiology Program, with a focus on seeking the answers to these fundamental questions: How does life begin and evolve? Is there life beyond Earth and, if so, how can we detect it? What is the future of life on Earth and beyond?

    U.S. citizenship is required for the NAI Director.

    Interested individuals should apply at: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/393518700. You can also go to USAJobs at https://www.usajobs.gov/. In the keyword search box, type vacancy number “AR15S0001”. Select “Director, NASA Astrobiology Institute”, then click “Apply Online”.

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    A Tribute to Barry Blumberg

    A NASA portrait of Dr. Baruch Blumberg in 1999. Image credit: NASA/Tom Trower A NASA portrait of Dr. Baruch Blumberg in 1999. Image credit: NASA/Tom Trower

    Baruch S. “Barry” Blumberg, recipient of the 1976 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, was the founding director of the NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI). When Blumberg passed away suddenly of a heart attack at age 85 on April 5, 2011, it was a huge loss for the astrobiology community.

    This month, the journal Astrobiology features a tribute to Barry Blumberg written by current NAI Interim Director, Carl Pilcher. The article is freely available on the journal’s website, and provides a background of Blumberg’s remarkable life, his groundbreaking research, and his unforgettable contribution to astrobiology.

    Pilcher (2015) Explorer, Nobel Laureate, Astrobiologist: Things You Never Knew about Barry Blumberg. Astrobiology, Vol. 15(1).

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    Workshop on the Potential for Finding Life in a Europa Plume

    On February 18, 2015, the NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) and the Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) will co-host the Workshop on the Potential for Finding Life in a Europa Plume at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California.

    Current Europa missions under study by NASA are focused on answering the question “Is Europa habitable?” However, the potential presence of water plumes on the satellite could present an opportunity to pursue the question “Is there life on Europa?” Answering this question is far more challenging because measurements currently possible may provide only ambiguous results from a mission that either orbits or flies by Europa at relatively high velocity. To that end, NASA’s Planetary Science Division is convening a workshop to consider strategies to investigate Europa’s putative plumes for evidence of life. Invitees will be asked to provide feedback to NASA on the following key questions:

    • What measurements are needed to detect and characterize the presence of life in an acquired sample?
    • What instrumentation is needed to perform these measurements, and what is the current flight readiness of such instruments?
    • What is the amount and nature of the sample needed by these instruments and what sample preparation is necessary?
    • What constraints does the required nature of the sample place on the sample acquisition process?
    • What challenges are present to acquiring the necessary sample and obtaining life-detection measurements from a cubesat(s) deployed by a Europa mission?

    Registration is free. All attendees are requested to register, Click here to register Because the workshop is being held at a US federal facility, special provisions must be made for foreign participation (non-US citizens or non-Green Card holders). Such attendees should register promptly and follow the instructions on the registration website. Abstract submission has closed.

    For those unable to attend in person, a live stream of the talks can be viewed at https://ac.arc.nasa.gov/europa

    The workshop will be followed by a meeting of the Outer Planets Assessment Group on Feb. 19-20, also held at the Ames Research Center.

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    Astrobiology at AAAS

    Are you attending the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Meeting, February 12-16, and looking for sessions relevant to astrobiology? Below are a few that might interest you. You can also find the complete online program at: https://aaas.confex.com/aaas/2015/webprogram/start.html

    Exoplanets: New Worlds Aplenty
    Friday, 8:30-11:30 AM, Room 220B

    Earth History: Innovative Approaches to Studying Critical Transitions
    Friday, 1:30-4:30 PM, Room LL21B

    Searching for Alternative Chemistries of Life on Earth and Throughout the Universe
    Friday, 3:00-4:30 PM, Room LL20D

    Solar System Exploration by Remote Imaging
    Saturday, 10:00-11:30 AM, Room LL21D

    Scanning the Southern Skies: Harnessing Big Astronomy Data with the Square Kilometer Array
    Sunday, 1:30-4:30 PM, Room LL21B

    The Hubble Space Telescope: 25 Years of Imaging the Cosmos
    Sunday, 1:30-4:30 PM, Room 220B

    Astrobiology: Expanding Views of Life and Encountering New Societal Questions
    Monday, 9:45-11:15 AM, Room LL20C

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    NASA Astrobiology Program Minority Institution Research Support Program

    Do you have a colleague at a minority serving institution (MSI) with whom you would like to work more closely?

    Are you a faculty member at an MSI seeking a sabbatical with a NASA Astrobiology Program investigator?

    Do you have a current Astrobiology Program project and would like to host a faculty member from a MSI?

    The Astrobiology Program Minority Institution Research Support (MIRS) program provides funded opportunities for researchers from minority serving institutions to initiate partnerships with researchers in the field of astrobiology. Past MIRS Scholars have worked with researchers at RPI, NASA Ames, NASA Goddard, the University of Houston, JPL, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and the Scripps Research Institute.

    The deadline for the 2015 MIRS Program applications is March 16, 2015.

    Please contact Melissa Kirven-Brooks, Melissa.kirven@nasa.gov for more information.

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    Amendment to Discovery 2014 AO

    The NASA Announcement of Opportunity (AO) NNH14ZDA014O, “Discovery 2014,” has been amended to:

    1. Shift the due date for electronic proposals to February 18, 2015 from February 16, 2015, and the deadline for the submission of proposals on CD-ROM has been changed to February 25, 2015.

    2. Add a requirement for color-coding of export-controlled material in the body of the proposal to Requirement 92, and

    3. Modify Requirement B-77 to remove the requirement that an estimated cost for the Engineering Science Investigation be included in proposal Appendix J.14.

    For more information, go to: http://nspires.nasaprs.com/

    Select “Solicitations” then “Open Solicitations” then “NNH14ZDA014O”.

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    Science Mission Directorate Seeking Volunteer Reviewers

    The Science Mission Directorate is seeking subject matter experts to serve as mail-in and/or panel meeting reviewers of research proposals in Earth and Space Science.

    We have posted new volunteer reviewer forms for ROSES 2014 Habitable Worlds, Astrophysics Research and Analysis calls, and the Earth and Space Science graduate student fellowship programs.

    To volunteer just fill out the forms at http://science.nasa.gov/researchers/volunteer-review-panels/

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    International Space Science Institute (ISSI) Call for Proposals 2015

    Proposal Deadline: March 31, 2015

    This Call is jointly made by the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) – Bern, Switzerland and ISSI -­ BJ (Beijing, china). Successful applicants for International Teams can organize all or part of their team meetings either in Bern or in Beijing, but the applicants are required to show the “ added value ” of ISSI or ISSI -­ BJ in the applications. The applicants are, therefore, required to indicate clearly if they are applying for ISSI and/or for ISSI -­ BJ.

    The purpose of this Call is to invite proposals for study projects from International Teams. Teams are one of the ISSI and ISSI ­‐ BJ tools, through which relatively small groups of scientists involved in Space Research can work together in an efficient and flexible form at several subsequent meetings, during which data are analysed and compared with theories and models. This call is open to scientists of any nationality actively involved in the following research fields: 1. Space Sciences (Solar and Heliospheric Physics , Solar-­Terrestrial Sciences, Space Plasma and Magnetospheric Physics, Planetary Sciences, Astrobiology, Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Fundamental Physics in Space). 2. Earth Sciences using space data.

    For all the Call information, visit: http://www.issibern.ch/spotlight.html

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    RECENTLY PUBLISHED RESEARCH


    Rock Art Draws Scientists to Ancient Lakes

    Some of the purported “swimmers” in the Cave of the Swimmers, Egypt. Credit: NASA Photo/Chris McKay Some of the purported “swimmers” in the Cave of the Swimmers, Egypt. Credit: NASA Photo/Chris McKay

    Seven thousand year-old rock paintings in the Sahara desert have, somewhat serendipitously, helped uncover evidence of ancient lake beds. Researchers discovered the mineral remnants of the lake while studying a region well-known for its rock art. The research — presented in the Journal of African Earth Sciences — was partly funded by the NASA Astrobiology Program.

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    Rare Mineral in Wisconsin Meteorite Crater

    With support from the NASA Astrobiology Program, Cavosie brought students from the University of Puerto Rico to study outcrops at the Rock Elm meteorite impact structure. Reidite was found in the samp With support from the NASA Astrobiology Program, Cavosie brought students from the University of Puerto Rico to study outcrops at the Rock Elm meteorite impact structure. Reidite was found in the samples they collected. Credit: Aaron Cavosie

    Researchers have identified a rare mineral in a Wisconsin meteorite crater. The mineral reidite was found in the Rock Elm impact structure, making this only the fourth site on Earth where it has been identified.

    Reidite is a high-pressure mineral with well-constrained formation conditions, and was first identified in the laboratory in the 1960s. The only other sites where it has been spotted in nature include the Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure on the east shore of Virginia, the Ries Crater in western Bavaria, Germany, and the Xiuyan Crater in northern China.

    The initial findings were presented at the 2014 GSA Annual Meeting in Vancouver by Aaron Cavosie of the University of Puerto Rico, and member of the NASA Astrobiology Institute team at the University of Wisconsin.

    The research has been featured in a number of recent media publications. For more on the story:
    Wisconsin town took a big hit – and rare mineral proves it
    Rare Mineral Discovered in Ancient Meteorite Impact Crater
    Reidite in Rock Elm

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    Complex Ecosystems in Barren Deserts

    A biological soil crust in Hovenweep National Monument, a region located in southwestern Colorado and southeastern Utah. Credit: Nationalparks (Transferred by Nihonjoe)/Wikipedia A biological soil crust in Hovenweep National Monument, a region located in southwestern Colorado and southeastern Utah. Credit: Nationalparks (Transferred by Nihonjoe)/Wikipedia

    “Biological soil crusts” don’t look like much. In fact, people often trample right over these dark, or green-tinted, sometimes raised patches in the desert soil. But these scruffy stretches can house delicate ecosystems as varied and complexly interwoven as that of a lush, tropical rainforest.

    Three new papers in the scientific journal Genome Association shed light on the microbes that commonly set up shop in biological soil crusts in Utah’s Moab Desert:

    - Draft Genome Sequence of Massilia sp. Strain BSC265, Isolated from Biological Soil Crust of Moab, Utah

    - Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus sp. Strain BSC154, Isolated from Biological Soil Crust of Moab, Utah

    - Draft Genome Sequence of Microvirga sp. Strain BSC39, Isolated from Biological Soil Crust of Moab, Utah

    The papers present the genome of three different bacteria. These genomes contain genes known to enable certain biological forms and functions. Identifying these genes therefore speaks to the interplay of these bacteria as they eke out a living in their shared, severe environment.

    The work was supported in part by the NASA Astrobiology Institute and the Exobiology & Evolutionary Biology elements of the NASA Astrobiology Program.

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    Curiosity Spots Intriguing Rocks on Mars

    Overlay of sketch on photograph from above to assist in the identification of the structures on the rock bed surface. Image credit: Noffke (2015). Courtesy of ASTROBIOLOGY, published by Mary Ann Liebe Overlay of sketch on photograph from above to assist in the identification of the structures on the rock bed surface. Image credit: Noffke (2015). Courtesy of ASTROBIOLOGY, published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

    A careful study of images taken by the NASA rover Curiosity has revealed intriguing similarities between ancient sedimentary rocks on Mars and structures shaped by microbes on Earth. The findings suggest, but do not prove, that life may have existed earlier on the Red Planet. The photos were taken as Curiosity drove through the Gillespie Lake outcrop in Yellowknife Bay.

    Click Here to read the entire article from the Astrobiology Magazine.

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    Contamination of Impacted Meteorites Can Happen Quickly

    Scott Sandford next to a cryovacuum systems that helps reveal the chemistry that produces organic compounds of astrobiological interest. Credit: NASA Ames/Sandford Scott Sandford next to a cryovacuum systems that helps reveal the chemistry that produces organic compounds of astrobiological interest. Credit: NASA Ames/Sandford

    A team of scientists has published the results of an investigative survey into the Sutter’s Mill meteorite that landed in California in 2012. The results reveal that the meteorite contained a number of features associated with minerals such as olivines, phyllosilicates, carbonates, and possibly pyroxenes, as well as organics. However, a key conclusion of the paper, and one that is likely to be of keen interest to astrobiologists, is confirmation that meteorites can become contaminated by Earth-based organics very quickly.

    The paper, “Mid-infrared Study of Stones from the Sutter’s Mill Meteorite,” was published online in the March, 2014 issue of the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science. The research includes work by co-author Scott Sandford, who leads the new NASA Astrobiology Institute team at the NASA Ames Research Center.

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    Methane and Organic Molecules in Gale Crater

    NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity drilled into this rock target, “Cumberland,” during the 279th Martian day, or sol, of the rover’s work on Mars (May 19, 2013) and collected a powdered sample of material fr NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity drilled into this rock target, “Cumberland,” during the 279th Martian day, or sol, of the rover’s work on Mars (May 19, 2013) and collected a powdered sample of material from the rock’s interior. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

    NASA’s Curiosity rover has made two of its most important observations on Mars since arriving on the planet in 2012. First, the rover measured a spike in levels of the organic chemical methane in the local atmosphere of its Gale Crater research site.

    The second big discovery came when the rover drilled into a rock dubbed “Cumberland.” Samples from the mudstone were analyzed by Curiosity’s Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument, and provided the first definitive detection of organic molecules on the martian surface.

    Astrobiologists have been hunting for organic material on Mars for decades. Organic molecules are typically built from atoms of carbon and hydrogen, and they are often referred to as the ‘building blocks’ for life as we know it. However, there is not enough information to determine whether or not the martian organics found by Curiosity are biological or non-biological in origin. Many non-biological processes on Mars could have produced them, including the delivery of materials by meteorites or geological reactions in the rock.

    Development of instruments on the Curiosity rover, including Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry & Mineralogy (CheMin), was supported by the ASTID element of the NASA Astrobiology Program.

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    CAREERS & EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES


    NASA Astrobiology Postdoctoral Fellowship Program

    Application Deadline: March 1, 2015

    The NASA Astrobiology Program element of the NASA Postdoctoral Program (NPP) provides opportunities for Ph.D. scientists and engineers of unusual promise and ability to perform research on problems largely of their own choosing, yet compatible with the research interests of the NASA Astrobiology Program.
    The NASA Postdoctoral Program is administered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU). For application information, visit: http://nasa.orau.org/postdoc.

    Astrobiology Program NPP Fellows are included in an on-line directory on the Astrobiology Program website and are given access to NASA Astrobiology Institute collaborative tools. Astrobiology Fellows may also act as ‘Ambassadors’ amongst the NAI Teams and/or the Exobiology and Evolutionary Biology, Planetary Science and Technology Through Analog Research, MatiSSE, PICASSO and the Habitable Worlds teams of researchers, and between the Astrobiology Program and the broader scientific community, helping to define and lead the field of astrobiology.

    The intent of this program is to develop outstanding early career astrobiology researchers, broaden the scope of Astrobiology Program research, and continue to build and integrate the astrobiology community. Accordingly, priority for selection will be given to applicants whose proposed research is particularly interdisciplinary and/or innovative. Research that involves one or more elements of the Astrobiology Program will also be given priority for selection, as will research that broadens the activities of the Program. Proposals for research that incrementally extend an ongoing project will be given lower selection priority.

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    Student Travel Grants for Upcoming Mars Meetings

    1) Workshop on Issues in Crater Studies and the Dating of Planetary Surfaces (May 19-22, 2015 in Laurel, MD)
    – Application Deadline: March 5, 2015

    2) Fourth International Planetary Dunes Workshop (May 19-22, 2015 in Boise, ID) – Application Deadline: March 5, 2015

    These opportunities are open to undergraduate and graduate students with Mars-related research interests who are US citizens or legal residents. Information and the applications are posted on the MEPAG site: http://mepag.nasa.gov/student.cfm?expand=student

    Questions should be directed to Serina Diniega: serina.diniega@jpl.nasa.gov

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    Astrobiology Graduate Conference (AbGradCon 2015)

    Application Deadline: March 10, 2015

    The Astrobiology Graduate Conference (AbGradCon), an interdisciplinary conference organized by and for graduate students and early career scientists, will be held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on July 19th through 23rd, 2015. Graduate students and early-career scientists (astronomers, biologists, chemists, educators, engineers, geologists, planetary scientists and social scientists) whose research addresses a topic relevant to astrobiology are encouraged to visit the website for more information: http://abgradcon.org.

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    Summer School: Water, Ice and the Origin of Life in the Universe

    Application Deadline: March 15, 2015

    The summer school “Water, Ice and the Origin of Life in the Universe”, to be held in Iceland from July 1–14, 2015, aims to give participants a thorough high-level introduction to the role of water in the evolution of life in the cosmos, starting from formation of water molecules in space and ending with evolution of the first organisms. It will bring together students and highly merited researchers from a multitude of science branches, making it a truly multidisciplinary event. The program is co-organized by the Nordic Network of Astrobiology, the University of Hawai’i at Manoa, the European Astrobiology Campus and the EU COST Action “Origins and Evolution of Life on Earth and in the Universe”. Field studies on the colonization of lava fields and glaciers will complement the lectures.

    The program of the summer school consists of:
    – lectures by internationally leading scientists covering a broad range of subjects in astrobiology
    – investigation of colonisation of volcanic rocks and glaciers with in situ life detection techniques
    – excursions to geologically and biologically interesting sites, especially extreme environments (lava caves, new lava fields, geysers, hot springs, solfatares)
    – 2 poster sessions for students and early career scientists

    For further information, visit: http://www.nordicastrobiology.net/Iceland2015

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    Postdoctoral Fellowship Opportunity in Geobiology at the Agouron Institute

    Application Deadline March 15, 2015

    At least three postdoctoral fellowships will be awarded in 2015 for young investigators pursuing studies in the field of Geobiology particularly those studies that merge an understanding of modern biological processes with application to interpretation of the ancient rock record. The Agouron Institute encourages cross-disciplinary training, therefore it is desirable for students who have conducted PhD level studies on modern processes to submit proposals focused on ancient geobiological processes, and vice versa. Each award includes an annual stipend ($60,000/year one, $62,000/year two) and an annual research supplement ($5,000 for supplies and travel). No overhead is provided with these fellowships.

    Applications will be accepted from students completing or have recently completed graduate studies for PhD or equivalent degrees. Preference will be for applicants with no more than one year of postdoctoral experience. International students are welcome to apply. Awards can only be issued to non-profit research universities or research institutions.

    Please submit the application and proposal electronically to info@agi.org. Be sure to have in the subject line: “Geobio Fellowship App: Your Name.” Please complete the following (1-3 below) in Times or Times New Roman (font size 12). Please use side margins no smaller than 0.5 inch with a bottom margin of 1” (1.7” for A4 paper).

    1. Application form (4 pages) that includes a short summary of prior research experience, summary of proposed research and a personal autobiographical statement.

    2. Brief research proposal (2-3 pages; references page 4; figures page 5 if needed). Be sure to include the title of the proposal at the beginning of the proposal.

    3. References. Please complete the top of the form (see below) and send it to your references. They may attach a letter after completing the ranking scale. a) postdoctoral research sponsor b) thesis advisor, and c) two additional research scientists.

    Please have reference form/letters submitted electronically to info@agi.org. Be sure to have in the subject line: “Geobio Fellowship App: Your Name.” Or, mail directly to the Agouron Institute, 1055 E. Colorado Blvd, Suite 250, Pasadena, CA 91106, USA.

    Awards will be announced by May 15, 2015. Fellowships may begin during the period of July 1, 2015 to January 15, 2016.

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    2014 Nininger Meteorite Award

    Application Deadline: March 31, 2015

    The Center for Meteorite Studies at Arizona State University is pleased to announce the application opportunity for the 2014 Nininger Meteorite Award for undergraduate and graduate students pursuing research in meteoritical sciences. The Nininger Meteorite Award recognizes outstanding student achievement in the meteoritical sciences as embodied by an original research paper.

    Applicants must be the first, but not sole, author of the paper and must be studying at an educational institution in the United States. Papers must cover original research conducted by the student and must have been written, submitted, or published between January 1, 2014, and December 31, 2014. The Nininger Award recipient receives $1000 and an engraved plaque commemorating the honor. Further information about the Nininger Award and application instructions are located at http://meteorites.asu.edu/nininger.

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    NASA Office of Education Scholarship and Research Opportunities

    Application Deadline: March 31, 2015

    NASA Office of Education (OE) is accepting applications for NASA Scholarship and Research Opportunities (SRO). Scholarship awards are made to individuals pursuing degrees in undergraduate studies leading to Associate’s or Bachelor’s degree specifically in areas of projected deficiencies in the NASA Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) workforce. The NASA Scholarship and Research Opportunities are the:

    - Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP) which awards scholarships for individuals in one or more relevant NASA-related STEM disciplines. Students must currently attend or plan to attend an accredited Minority Serving Institution (MSI) in the United States.

    - Aeronautics Undergraduate Scholarships (AUS), which awards scholarships for individuals in areas, related to aeronautics. These scholarships are directed toward enhancing the state of aeronautics for the nation, transforming the nation’s air transportation system, and developing the knowledge, tools, and technologies to support future air and space vehicles.

    Information and applications can be found at the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative.

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    NASA Astrobiology Program Student Early Career Collaboration Awards

    Application Deadline: April 1, 2015

    The Astrobiology Early Career Collaboration Awards offer research-related travel support for undergraduate, graduate students, postdocs, and junior scientists. Applicants are encouraged to use these resources to circulate among two or more laboratories supported by the NASA Astrobiology Program (Exobiology and Evolutionary Biology, the NAI, Planetary Science and Technology Through Analog Research, MatiSSE, PICASSO and the Habitable Worlds), however any travel that is critical for the applicant’s research will be considered. Travelers must be formally affiliated with a U.S. institution. Requests are limited to $5,000. To find out more, visit: https://astrobiology.nasa.gov/nai/funding/nasa-astrobiology-early-career-collaboration-award/

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    UPCOMING DEADLINES IN THE NEXT 30 DAYS


    Feb 18 – Abstract Submission Deadline for the Japanese Geoscience Union (JpGU) http://www.jpgu.org/meeting_e/

    Feb 18 – Workshop on the Potential for Finding Life in a Europa Plume https://astrobiology.nasa.gov/calendar/europa-plume-workshop/

    Feb 18 – Discovery 2014 Proposals are Due http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/

    Feb 19 – Outer Planets Assessment Group (OPAG) Meeting http://www.lpi.usra.edu/opag/

    Feb 23 – Abstract Submission Deadline for the 66th International Astronautical Congress (IAC 2015) http://www.iac2015.org/

    Feb 24 – Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG) Meeting http://mepag.nasa.gov/

    Feb 28 – Abstract Submission Deadline for the Workshop on the Formation of the Solar System II https://indico.mpifr-bonn.mpg.de/indico/conferenceDisplay.py?confId=94

    Mar 1 – Abstract Submission Deadline for the 28th Annual Meeting of the Israel Society for Astrobiology and the Study of the Origin of Life (ILASOL) http://www.ilasol.org.il/fMeetings

    Mar 1 – Application Deadline for the NASA Astrobiology Postdoctoral Fellowship Program http://nasa.orau.org/postdoc/application/index.htm

    Mar 1 – Application Deadline for the 1st Advanced School on Exoplanetary Science http://www.iiassvietri.it/en/ases2015.html

    Mar 2 – Abstract Submission Deadline for the 11th IAA Low-Cost Planetary Mission Conference (LCPM-11) http://www.dlr.de/pf/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-9912/

    Mar 4 – Abstract Submission Deadline for the Astrobiology Science Conference (AbSciCon) 2015 http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/abscicon2015/

    Mar 5 – Abstract Submission Deadline for the Workshop on Issues in Crater Studies and the Dating of Planetary Surfaces http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/craterstats2015/

    Mar 5 – Abstract Submission Deadline for the Fourth International Planetary Dunes Workshop: Integrating Models, Remote Sensing, and Field Data http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/dunes2015/dunes20151st.shtml

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