NAI

  1. Scientists Practice Mars Drilling Near Acidic Spanish River


    To develop techniques to drill into the surface of Mars to look for signs of life, NASA and Spanish scientists recently began drilling 150 meters (495 feet) into the ground near the source of the waters of the Rio Tinto, a river in southwestern Spain, part of a three-year effort that will include the search for underground life forms.

    Read More

    Comments No comments yet, you could be the first.
  1. Surveying the Scene – Martian Style


    Like all good exploration vessels, each of the Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, includes a mast. Instead of a crow’s nest and a lookout, however, the rover mast-a little more than a meter tall-is topped by a pair of cameras-collectively called the Pancam (panoramic camera)-that can image the scene around the rover as sharply as a person with 20-20 vision.

    The Pancam’s two lenses aim slightly inward from parallel, allowing twin images to be used as a stereo pair, showing the scene in three dimensions. And the whole camera head can rotate 360 degrees, as well ...

    Read More

    Comments No comments yet, you could be the first.
  1. Infrared Eyes Set to Launch


    In the early morning of August 25th at 1:35:39 a.m. EDT, NASA successfully launched the new Space Infrared Telescope Facility aboard a Boeing Delta II Heavy Launch Vehicle into the first-ever Earth-trailing orbit.

    Read More

    Comments No comments yet, you could be the first.
  1. Researchers Find Antarctic Lake Water Will Fizz Like a Soda


    Water released from Lake Vostok, deep beneath the south polar ice sheet, could gush like a popped can of soda if not contained, opening the lake to possible contamination and posing a potential health hazard to NASA and university researchers.

    Read More

    Comments No comments yet, you could be the first.
  1. NASA’S First Scout Mission Selected for 2007 Mars Launch


    NASA has selected Phoenix, an innovative and relatively low-cost mission, to study the red planet, as the first Mars Scout mission. The Phoenix lander mission is scheduled for launch in 2007.

    Read More

    Comments No comments yet, you could be the first.
  1. The Rise of Oxygen


    Understanding the history of oxygen accumulation in Earth’s atmosphere is an important topic in astrobiology. It has ramifications in the evolution of planetary habitability as well as using oxygen as a biomarker in the search for life on extrasolar planets.

    Read More

    Comments No comments yet, you could be the first.
  1. Follow the Sun


    The two NASA rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, which are speeding their way towards a January rendezvous with Mars, are arguably the most advanced robotic spacecraft ever sent to explore another heavenly body. But to the robotics researchers working on the Life in the Atacama project, Spirit and Opportunity are already history.

    This group of hardware and software wizards, based at Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Institute are designing rovers that, they hope, will roam the Martian surface, not in this decade, but in the next. Their goal: autonomous robots with sufficient onboard intelligence to explore for days at a time ...

    Read More

    Comments No comments yet, you could be the first.
  1. Ancient Planet


    Some 13 billion years ago in a distant cluster of stars, a planet formed. Remarkably it’s still there, according to data from the Hubble Space Telescope.

    Read More

    Comments No comments yet, you could be the first.
  1. Newly Launched 'Opportunity’ Follows Mars-Bound 'Spirit’


    NASA launched its second Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, late Monday night (July 7) aboard a Delta II launch vehicle whose bright glare briefly illuminated Florida Space Coast beaches.

    Read More

    Comments No comments yet, you could be the first.
  1. Shining Light on Life’s Origin


    When ultraviolet radiation was more intense than today, and the early Earth had a mix of nitrogen-rich molecules, how did this primordial soup get cooked? And how did it not burn?

    Read More

    Comments No comments yet, you could be the first.
  1. NASA’s 'Spirit’ Rises on Its Way to Mars


    A NASA robotic geologist named Spirit began its seven-month journey to Mars at 10:58:47 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time on June 10 when its Delta II launch vehicle thundered aloft from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

    Read More

    Comments No comments yet, you could be the first.
  1. The Edge of Life


    Life – as we know it – needs water to survive. It doesn’t have to be a lot of water, at least not for microscopic life. Even in most of the world’s deserts, in regions where plant and animal life cannot subsist, bacteria and lichen manage to eke out an existence, clinging to life underneath or in the cracks within rocks.

    These organisms have adapted to living in some of the harshest, most extreme conditions on the planet. But are there places on Earth that are so dry that nothing can live there?

    That is one of the questions that ...

    Read More

    Comments No comments yet, you could be the first.
  1. Pictures of Earth From Mars


    NASA’s Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft has captured unique images of a lovely blue alien world: Earth

    Read More

    Comments No comments yet, you could be the first.
  1. NAI Europa Focus Group Visits Arctic Ice-Field


    In this special Feature, NAI Senior Scientist David Morrison recounts a recent trip to Barrow, Alaska with the Europa Focus Group.

    Read More

    Comments No comments yet, you could be the first.
  1. Photosynthesis in the Abyss


    Recently, researchers have discovered a bacterium in the nearly pitch-black environment of deep-sea hydrothermal vents that carries out photosynthesis, using light as its only source of energy.

    Read More

    Comments No comments yet, you could be the first.
< prev next >
1 ... 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 ... 92