3 items with the tag “terrestrial planets

  • Project 1: Looking Outward: Studies of the Physical and Chemical Evolution of Planetary Systems
    NAI 2013 Carnegie Institution of Washington Annual Report

    We continue to apply theory and observations to investigate the nature and distribution of extrasolar planets both through radial velocity and astrometric methods, the composition of circumstellar disks, early mixing and transport in young disks, and late mixing and planetary migration in the Solar System, and Solar System bodies.

    ROADMAP OBJECTIVES: 1.1 1.2 2.2 3.1
  • Climates and Evolution of Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets
    NAI 2013 VPL at University of Washington Annual Report

    Planetary climate results from the interplay of a large number of different physical processes, including radiative heating and cooling, advection and dynamics, latent heating and cloud effects, atmosphere-interior interactions, and the presence of life. Atmospheres and climate then evolve through time due to interplay between these processes and longer-term effects, such as atmospheric escape, orbital evolution, and other dynamical interactions. Since planetary climate determines surface habitability, we can better understand how planets maintain habitability over long time periods by studying and modeling the large network of interactions that determine the atmospheric state of a planet and how it changes through time.

    ROADMAP OBJECTIVES: 1.1 1.2
  • Disks and the Origins of Planetary Systems
    NAI 2013 NASA Ames Research Center Annual Report

    This task is concerned with the evolution of complex habitable environments. The planet formation process begins with fragmentation of large molecular clouds into flattened disks. This disk is in many ways an astrochemical “primeval soup” in which cosmically abundant elements are assembled into increasingly complex hydrocarbons and mixed in the dust and gas within the disk. Gravitational attraction among the myriad small bodies leads to planet formation. If the newly formed planet is a suitable distance from its star to support liquid water at the surface, it is in the so-called “habitable zone.” The formation process and identification of such life-supporting bodies is the goal of this project.

    ROADMAP OBJECTIVES: 1.1 1.2 2.2 3.1 4.1 4.3