4 items with the tag “organic-mineral surface interactions

  • Project 4: Geochemical Steps Leading to the Origins of Life
    NAI 2009 Carnegie Institution of Washington Annual Report

    The project titled “Geochemical Steps Leading to the Origins of Life” sets a out a research object focusing on exploring the natural intersection of abiological organic chemistry and the mineral world. Assuming that life emerged on Earth as a consequence of natural, geochemical, processes. We ask what did the organic landscape look like before life, how did organic-mineral surface interactions affect this landscape, and can we identify any connections between this abiotic organic Earth and the subsequent emergence of life.

    ROADMAP OBJECTIVES: 3.1 3.2
  • Project 4: Geochemical Steps Leading to the Origins of Life
    NAI 2010 Carnegie Institution of Washington Annual Report

    The project titled “Geochemical Steps Leading to the Origins of Life” sets a out a research object focusing on exploring the natural intersection of abiological organic chemistry and the mineral world. Assuming that life emerged on Earth as a consequence of natural, geochemical, processes. We ask what did the organic landscape look like before life, how did organic-mineral surface interactions affect this landscape, and can we identify any connections between this abiotic organic Earth and the subsequent emergence of life.

    ROADMAP OBJECTIVES: 3.1 3.2
  • Project 4: Geochemical Steps Leading to the Origins of Life
    NAI 2011 Carnegie Institution of Washington Annual Report

    This project involves research designed to aid understanding the geochemical roots of life focusing in particular on the role of mineral surfaces play in catalyzing organic reactions that may have biochemical utility.

    ROADMAP OBJECTIVES: 3.1 3.2
  • Project 4: Geochemical Steps Leading to the Origins of Life
    NAI 2012 Carnegie Institution of Washington Annual Report

    The origins of life on Earth remains one of the outstanding problems in science. This project seeks to go to the root of the problem and focus on what were likely critical first steps. The research focuses on the natural synthesis of small organic molecules and subsequent interaction with potentially catalytic mineral phases opening up the system to greater chemical complexity. Organic mineral interactions are complex and difficult to analyze. Using a variety of powerful spectroscopic and mass spectrometric tools we are able to perform experiments that yield data that aid our understanding of such interactions.

    ROADMAP OBJECTIVES: 3.1 3.2