NAI

  1. AbSciCon 2015 Abstract Submission Now Open


    Abstract submissions for the 2015 Astrobiology Science Conference (AbSciCon) are now open. For details, visit the AbSciCon 2015 website at: http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/abscicon2015/

    AbSciCon 2015 is the next in a series of conferences organized by researchers within the interdisciplinary field of astrobiology. Scientists from around the world will gather in Chicago, Illinois, from June 15-19, 2015, to report new research findings and plan for astrobiology’s future. The theme of AbSciCon 2015 is “Habitability, Habitable Worlds, and Life.”

    Other key dates include:

    March 4, 2015 – Deadline for abstract submission and student travel grant applications
    March 4 ...

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  1. Methane and Organic Molecules in Gale Crater


    NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity drilled into this rock target, “Cumberland,” during the 279th Martian day, or sol, of the rover’s work on Mars (May 19, 2013) and collected a powdered sample of material fr NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity drilled into this rock target, “Cumberland,” during the 279th Martian day, or sol, of the rover’s work on Mars (May 19, 2013) and collected a powdered sample of material from the rock’s interior. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

    NASA’s Curiosity rover has made two of its most important observations on Mars since arriving on the planet in 2012. First, the rover measured a spike in levels of the organic chemical methane in the local atmosphere of its Gale Crater research site.

    The second big discovery came when the rover drilled into a rock ...

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  1. Workshop on the Potential for Finding Life in a Europa Plume


    Artist’s conception of water vapor plume erupting from the icy surface of Europa, a moon of Jupiter, based on data from the Hubble Space Telescope. Credit: NASA/ESA/K. Retherford/SWRI Artist’s conception of water vapor plume erupting from the icy surface of Europa, a moon of Jupiter, based on data from the Hubble Space Telescope. Credit: NASA/ESA/K. Retherford/SWRI

    SAVE THE DATE: Wednesday, February 18, 2015

    The NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) and the Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) will co-host the Workshop on the Potential for Finding Life in a Europa Plume at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California.

    Current Europa missions under study by NASA are focused on answering the question “Is Europa habitable?” However, the potential presence of water plumes on the ...

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  1. Astrobiology Related Sessions at AGU


    Looking for astrobiology related sessions at AGU? We’ve combed through the program and made this quick and easy cheat sheet.

    Download the astrobiology related sessions PDF here

    You can find the full program at: http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2014/scientific-program/

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  1. Successful First AbGradE Symposium


    Participants and keynote lecturers of the first AbGradE Symposum 2014. Photo courtesy AbGradE, Baptiste Journaux.

    AbGradE (Astrobiology Graduates in Europe) held its first symposium in Edinburgh, UK, 10–11 October. The symposium started with an icebreaker event and consisted of two days of scientific sessions combined with networking, a round table, and a public outreach and education event. Approximately 40 enthusiastic and motivated early-career astrobiologists from all over Europe and beyond attended the symposium, presenting their work followed by discussions that enhanced sharing ideas with their contemporaries.

    With the success of the first symposium, the committee is planning to hold the symposium biyearly along with the EANA meeting. For more information on AbGradE, visit: http ...

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  1. How Did Life Become Complex?


    A species of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) seen in a scanning electrograph image. Credit: NASA A species of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) seen in a scanning electrograph image. Credit: NASA

    Source: [astrobio.net

    The evolution of multicellular life on Earth happened with a number of key transitions from simple organisms to complex. Could the same transitions happen on other worlds? Frank Rosenzweig, an evolutionary geneticist at the University of Montana, is looking into such questions over the next five years with funding from the NASA Astrobiology Institute. His lab studies how life evolves “complex traits,” factors that influence everything from lifespan to biodiversity.

    Rosenzweig’s previous NASA funding came from the Exobiology and Evolutionary Biology Program ...

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  1. M-Dwarf Planets With Oxygen in Their Atmospheres?


    This artist's concept illustrates a young, red dwarf star surrounded by three planets. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-CalTech This artist's concept illustrates a young, red dwarf star surrounded by three planets. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-CalTech

    NAI astrobiologists from the Virtual Planetary Laboratory at the University of Washington, graduate student Rodrigo Luger and professor Rory Barnes, have shown that many terrestrial planets in the habitable zones of low mass (M dwarf) stars could have experienced extreme stellar heating for up to 1 billion years after planet formation. This could lead to oceanic evaporation and atmospheric oxygenation. The study has been accepted for publication in Astrobiology.

    Unlike the Sun, which formed over a span of a few tens of ...

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  1. How Can We Search for Life on Icy Moons?


    Artist’s conception of water vapor plume erupting from the icy surface of Europa, a moon of Jupiter, based on data from the Hubble Space Telescope. Credit: NASA/ESA/K. Retherford/SWRI Artist’s conception of water vapor plume erupting from the icy surface of Europa, a moon of Jupiter, based on data from the Hubble Space Telescope. Credit: NASA/ESA/K. Retherford/SWRI

    How likely is habitability on icy worlds, and how would we search for it? This is one of the questions driving a research team led by Isik Kanik at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    Kanik’s team was selected for a new grant from the NASA Astrobiology Institute for a five-year project looking at how metabolism could come about by way of chemical differences on icy worlds, and ...

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  1. Touchdown on a Comet


    Two images from Philae's Comet nucleus Infrared and Visible Analyzer (CIVA) confirm that the lander is on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. One of the lader's feet can be seen in the for Two images from Philae's Comet nucleus Infrared and Visible Analyzer (CIVA) confirm that the lander is on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. One of the lader's feet can be seen in the foreground. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CIVA

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has successfully performed the first soft landing on a comet. The Rosetta mission delivered the Philae lander to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on November 12, 2014. The first two images from the lander have now confirmed that the craft is safely positioned on the comet.

    For more on the Rosetta mission, visit: http://www.esa ...

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  1. Lack of Oxygen Delayed the Rise of Animals on Earth


    Chris Reinhard and Noah Planavsky conduct research for the study. Credit: Yale University Chris Reinhard and Noah Planavsky conduct research for the study. Credit: Yale University

    New research could explain why it took around a billion years for animal species to flourish on Earth after oxygen levels in the atmosphere began to increase.

    Animal life on Earth boomed around 800 million years ago at the end of the Proterozoic period, but scientists have long believed that there was sufficient oxygen in the atmosphere for this increase in animal diversity to occur much earlier. However, new findings published in the journal Science show that oxygen levels were only 0.1% of those we see ...

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  1. In Memoriam: Katrina Edwards


    Katrina J. Edwards, March 15, 1968 - October 26, 2014 Katrina J. Edwards, March 15, 1968 - October 26, 2014

    The astrobiology community deeply mourns the passing of Katrina Edwards, a geomicrobiologist and very bright light in many of our lives. Please see the blog set up by her family for more information on her life and work, and to contribute remembrances of Katrina.

    Katrina Jane Edwards passed away peacefully on October 26, 2014, after a long illness. She was born March 15, 1968, in Columbus, Oh., the third of five children raised by Timothy and Sandra Edwards and big sister Laura Edwards. Katrina completed her secondary education at Columbus Alternative ...

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  1. Titan Glowing at Dusk and Dawn


    High in the atmosphere of Titan, large patches of two trace gases glow near the north pole, on the dusk side of the moon, and near the south pole, on the dawn side. Brighter colors indicate stronger s High in the atmosphere of Titan, large patches of two trace gases glow near the north pole, on the dusk side of the moon, and near the south pole, on the dawn side. Brighter colors indicate stronger signals from the two gases, HNC (left) and HC3N (right); red hues indicate less pronounced signals. Image Credit: NRAO/AUI/NSF

    New maps of Saturn’s moon Titan reveal large patches of trace gases shining brightly near the north and south poles. These regions are curiously shifted off the poles, to the east or west, so that dawn is breaking over the southern ...

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  1. Exomoons Could Be Abundant Sources of Habitability


    Europa is one of the moons in our solar system that could host life. What about beyond the solar system? Credit: NASA/JPL/Ted Stryk Europa is one of the moons in our solar system that could host life. What about beyond the solar system? Credit: NASA/JPL/Ted Stryk

    With about 4,000 planet candidates from the Kepler Space Telescope data to analyze so far, astronomers are busy trying to figure out questions about habitability. Look at our own solar system, however, and there’s a big gap in the information we need. Most of the planets have moons, so surely at least some of what Kepler finds would have them as well. Tracking down these tiny worlds, however, is a challenge.

    A new ...

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  1. Ariel Anbar Named President of Biogeosciences Leadership at AGU



    Ariel Anbar, Principal Investigator (PI) in the Exobiology and Evolutionary Biology (Exo/Evo) element of the NASA Astrobiology Program, has been named President-Elect of the Biogeosciences Leadership at the American Geophysical Union for the 2015-2016 Term.

    Anbar is a Professor in Arizona State University’s (ASU) School of Earth and Space Exploration. Earlier this year, he was also selected as the first Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor at ASU.

    In addition to his work with Exo/Evo, Anbar is also a Co-Investigator for the new NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) team at the University of California: Riverside.

    The 2014 AGU Fall ...

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  1. Sean Solomon to Receive National Medal of Science


    Sean Solomon, PI for NASA's MESSENGER mission, has been selected to receive the National Medal of Science. Credit: NASA Sean Solomon, PI for NASA's MESSENGER mission, has been selected to receive the National Medal of Science. Credit: NASA

    Sean Solomon, former principal investigator for the NASA Astrobiology Institute team at the Carnegie Institution, has been selected to receive the National Medal of Science.

    Solomon is now the Director of Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, and serves as principal investigator for NASA’s MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) mission. MESSENGER is the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury and is currently completing a second extended mission at the Solar System’s inner-most planet. Additional NASA missions ...

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